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Around the Web this Week

November 13-19



Around the Web this Week
FINANCIAL TIMES' TOP 50 WOMEN IN WORLD BUSINESS 2011
Well, it's that time of year again! The Financial Times has just published its 2011 ranking of top women in world business. This year, Irene Rosenfeld, chief executive of Kraft Foods won the top honour. She replaces Indra Nooyi of PepsiCo who was judged the leading chief female executive in 2009 and 2010 (number 3 this year). While most of the women featured come from North America, China and India still account for 20% of female executives in the ranking. Sadly though, it doesn't include any female business leaders from Latin America. The jury this year decided to reward risk taking by business leaders. In Irene Rosenfeld's case, she carried out a series of big acquisitions, and has profoundly changed the core structure of the Kraft Foods Group. Her plan was not universally welcomed by investors, but she is praised for making hard choices and being decisive. A great role model for all the other female executives out there who aspire to do the same.

 

Japanese women do not feel valued by the corporate world
Japanese women do not feel valued by the corporate world
WHY ARE JAPANESE WOMEN DISAPPOINTED WITH THEIR CAREERS?
A study from the Center from Work-Life Policy reveals shocking figures on the mass exodus of Japanese women from the workforce. It showed that 74% of Japanese women with degrees voluntarily quit their jobs, far more than the 31% of Americans and the 35% of Germans. The reasoning behind this is that Japanese women are even more negatively impacted by societal pressures than American women. According to the study, 63% say that they quit because their career was not satisfying and nearly half left because they felt stalled in their careers. The study also found that despite the majority of women wanting to return to work just two and a half years later, only 43% successfully land jobs and usually with a deep pay cut. Although women made up some 48% of the labour force in 2009, a government report on Gender Equality showed women held just 10.5% or managerial positions.
What can be done? For Japanese women, the best bet is to work for a foreign company. Two-thirds of university-educated Japanese women see European or American firms as more female-friendly than Japanese ones. While some companies, like Shiseido, are making efforts to retain their female employees, it seems it's going to take more than small concessions to work-life balance to make a big change in the local corporate mindset. 

 

More women in top jobs equals more generous companies
More women in top jobs equals more generous companies
WOMEN MAKE COMPANIES BETTER
A new study conducted by researchers at Catalyst and Harvard Business School (HBS) suggests that what’s good for women is good for business and also for society as a whole. Catalyst and HBS researchers found that companies with more women board directors and corporate officers contributed significantly more charitable funds, on average, than companies with fewer or no women in senior roles. For example, in 2007, the average donations of companies with three or more women directors were 28 times higher than those of companies with no women directors. But why does the presence of women in leadership positions influence the amount of money a corporation gives to charity? Some research  suggests that, either naturally or due to a lifetime of socialization, women generally exhibit more empathy than men. It would stand to reason, then, that they'd generally be more interested in devoting some corporate profits to what they perceive as the greater good rather than the bottom line.

 

Hillary Clinton at APEC
Hillary Clinton at APEC
HILLARY CLINTON: UNLOCK THE POWER OF WOMEN'S POTENTIAL
During her latest speech at APEC, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton called on countries and companies around the world to help women play a bigger role in the world's economy. We can no longer underestimate the power of women. By 2014, women will control $15 trillion and by 2028, women will control two thirds of consumer spending. Over the last ten years the growth amassed by women's activity has been higher than that of China. So empowering women is not only "the right thing to do", it is also "the smart thing to do" says Clinton. Saying women's empowerment does not get enough attention, Clinton thinks the best way to make people understand the importance of the issue is to reason in terms of dollars and cents. When everybody starts to realize that barriers imposed to women don't just stifle women, they stifle economies too, maybe things will change.

 

GEW, a fantastic opportunity for start ups
GEW, a fantastic opportunity for start ups
GLOBAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP WEEK IS MORE POPULAR THAN EVER
This week was Global Entrepreneurship Week, a seven-day worldwide event showcase for current and aspiring entrepreneurs. Global Entrepreneurship Week was started in 2008 by former UK prime minister Gordon Brown and Kauffman Foundation President and chief executive Carl Schramm. The gathering now claims 24,000 partner organizations with 37,000 activities and 7 million individual participants. From showcasing social enterprises in India to developing an entrepreneurial hub in Chile for South America, there were over 30,000 events around the world in more than 100 countries. Coinciding with GEW, the Kauffman Foundation released a report, stating that the millennial generation is eager to start a business but has been discouraged by the economic downturn. Sadly, according to that report, women are less likely to want to start their own businesses than men are (44% of women vs. 57% of men).

 

 
 

Dimanche 20 Novembre 2011





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Dimanche 2 Octobre 2011 - 08:24 Around the Web This Week

Dimanche 25 Septembre 2011 - 06:23 Around the Web This Week







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